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  • BREAKING NEWS
    • Jul 18, 2019

    National Seniors Australia supports National Elder Abuse Conference in Brisbane

    Hosted by Aged and Disability Advocacy Australia and Caxton Legal Centre, and supported by National Seniors Australia, the National Elder Abuse Conference will be held in Brisbane on July 22 and 23. The conference aims to challenge the status quo and eliminate elder abuse with "insight, creativity and passion." Among the featured speakers are Bethany Brown from Human Rights Watch and investigative journalist Anne Connolly who covered elder abuse in aged care facilities and has since been covering the Royal Commission. more info

    • Jul 18, 2019

    International conferences on geroscience underway, third meeting scheduled in Australia in Aug.

    The first in a series of international meetings on aging was held in China in May. Geroscience is a research field which enhances understanding of the molecular and cellular underpinnings of the biology of aging which drives most chronic diseases in older adults. Organizers plan to publish proceedings from the meeting in Aging Medicine. A second International Perspectives on Geroscience meeting was held in San Francisco on May 29 and 30. Future meetings are scheduled for Sydney, Australia, between Aug. 26 and 28; Rehovot, Israel, Sept. 4 and 5; Madrid, Spain, Sept. 13 and 14; Singapore, Sept. 25 and 26; and Puerto Varas, Chile, from Nov. 18 to 21. more info

    • Jul 18, 2019

    'Graffiti villages' in Taiwan draw young people to rural places

    About half a dozen so-called "graffiti villages" in Taiwan are covered with artwork to inject life into rural places emptied of young people, say organizers. Like many industrialized places, Taiwan's economic transformation over the past few decades upended rural communities and led to demographic changes. But, drawing youngsters was less about economics and more about giving older adults something to look forward to and a chance to converse with people. It wasn't easy to persuade villagers to use their houses as a canvas, however once a few houses were painted, villagers began seeing more visitors. more info

    • Jul 17, 2019

    U.K. MPs warn home visits to ensure TV license fees are paid may traumatize elderly

    Elderly people who haven't been paying the license fee or have no evidence they receive Pension Credit, will be ordered pay. Free TV licenses will only be given to the over-75s who claim a pension credit as the BBC said they can't afford to carry on paying it. During a Commons select committee, the BBC informed MPs the visits would be made as sympathetically as possible, but MPs warn the more vulnerable elderly will be traumatized.
    Related:
    BEEB fee police: Over-75s face 'home visits' to make sure they pay their TV licence - The Sun more info

    • Jul 17, 2019

    Dementia care village in Singapore encourages residents live as independently as their condition allows

    Rather than being confined to a room or a bed, residents at dementia care villages in Singapore are allowed to wander about. They live with other residents in an apartment and have to manage the household with help from staff. This style of living is said to help slow the rate of decline in dementia patients by discouraging dependency, says the Ministry of Health. Associate Professor Reshma Merchant, head and senior consultant at the National University Hospital's division of geriatric medicine, adds a dementia village is meant to create happiness and enable residents to lead meaningful lives. The assisted living model in public housing will see seniors buying a home bundled with customizable care services such as housekeeping and emergency support. more info

    • Jul 17, 2019

    French-based assisted living multinational moves into Slovenia

    Orpea, a French multinational specializing in assisted living services, entered the Slovenian market via its Austrian subsidiary, Senecura, by purchasing a retirement home in eastern Slovenia, called Dosor. Senecura purchased the facility from the Radenci municipality and an Austrian bank, and plans to use it as a springboard into Slovenia, having previously acquired a license to build several small retirement homes around the country. more info

    • Jul 17, 2019

    U.K. pensioner stripped of savings after local council ruled she saved too much

    The elderly on low income may be stripped of their savings if they have more than roughly $15,000 saved. Mary Morley had about twice that amount. Last year, officials from Huntingdonshire District Council (HDC) began the process of taking it back. The council canceled her Housing Benefit and Council Tax Support and then demanded she repay about $15,000 from her savings. In the last five years, HDC tracked 27 people whose savings were allegedly too high. Of these, 16 were pensioners in receipt of the State Pension and all of them were on a low income which met the means test for Housing Benefit. more info

    • Jul 16, 2019

    Australian opposition demands government apologize to seniors after minister describes pension as 'generous'

    The Leader of the Opposition is asking the government to apologize to aged pensioners after Social Services Minister Anne Ruston claimed the pension benefit was generous and the nearly $50-a-day was welfare for people who can't look after themselves. The minister was on tour promoting changes to the rates, which could see seniors receive up to $560-a-year more, but the Department of Social Services couldn't confirm how many pensioners would get the maximum amount.
    Related:
    Disconnect between older Australians and government - NewsCorp Australia more info

    • Jul 16, 2019

    Chefs inform Australia's Royal Commission of poor menus, re-used food, cold meals in nursing homes

    Chef Timothy Deverell raised concerns about the lack of training to create texture-modified foods, menus with no input from residents until they complained and food served on open-air trolleys that was cold by the time it reached many residents. Chef Nicholas Hall added facilities would opt for finger food platters because they were cheap and didn't require a chef. Some meals would be repeated up to four times a week as providers tried to reduce costs. Food safety audits were too infrequent, said Hall, and facilities were often provided advance notice, meaning extra cleaners could be brought in.
    Related:
    Australian aged-care nightmare: From walking and talking to dead in three months - Stuff more info

    • Jul 16, 2019

    More than one-quarter of income in senior Japanese households stems from wages

    Over a quarter of Japanese households are headed by a person 65 years or older, notes data from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. As of June 2018, there were 14.1 million such senior households, including those with unmarried members under 18 years of age. This amounts to 27.6% of all households in Japan, as compared to just 6.3% in 1986. While 61.1% of household income came from pension payments, 25.4% stemmed from wages in a current job, indicating how many seniors in Japan are continuing to work after retirement to supplement their incomes. more info

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